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Predictive Modelling
Evidence

How Health Systems Could Avert ‘Triple Fail’ Events That Are Harmful, Are Costly, And Result In Poor Patient Satisfaction

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Lewis, G., et al.

Abstract

Health care systems in many countries are using the "Triple Aim"--to improve patients' experience of care, to advance population health, and to lower per capita costs--as a focus for improving quality. Population strategies for addressing the Triple Aim are becoming increasingly prevalent in developed countries, but ultimately success will also require targeting specific subgroups and individuals. Certain events, which we call "Triple Fail" events, constitute a simultaneous failure to meet all three Triple Aim goals. The risk of experiencing different Triple Fail events varies widely across people. We argue that by stratifying populations according to each person's risk and anticipated response to an intervention, health systems could more effectively target different preventive interventions at particular risk strata. In this article we describe how such an approach could be planned and operationalized. Policy makers should consider using this stratified approach to reduce the incidence of Triple Fail events, thereby improving outcomes, enhancing patient experience, and lowering costs.

 

Lewis, G., et al. (2013). "How Health Systems Could Avert ‘Triple Fail’ Events That Are Harmful, Are Costly, And Result In Poor Patient Satisfaction." Health Affairs 32(4): 669-676.



Website: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23569046


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